PEARL CARE

How to care for your Grow-With-Me® fine cultured pearl jewelry

We use only the finest freshwater cultured pearls for our Grow-With-Me® pearl bracelets and Grow-With-Me® pearl necklaces. These beautiful and delicate cultured gemstones can last a lifetime if cared for properly.

HOW TO STORE YOUR

Fine Pearl Jewelry

Always store your fine pearl jewelry in its own compartment in a soft-lined jewelry box. This ensures your beautiful pearls stay lustrous and blemish-free for years to come.

AVOID THESE ISSUES

Follow these pearl care tips to avoid these issues. Pearls are delicate gemstones and must be cared for properly to maintain their beautiful look.

ISSUE

SOLUTION

ISSUE

Dull, pitted, cracked nacre

SOLUTION

Cosmetics, perfume, hairspray, household chemicals, acidic perspiration, chlorinated water, and other harsh chemicals with ammonia or vinegar will damage the nacre of your cultured pearls. Your cultured pearl jewelry should be the last thing on and the first thing off. After each wear wipe your pearl jewelry down with a soft cloth dampened with water only (not soap). Never use an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner as this will damage your cultured pearls.

Common Myth

The oils in your skin will keep the nacre of your pearls conditioned and lustrous-looking.

The Truth

This statement is a myth – an old wives tale passed down as truth.

The oils in your skin and perspiration will actually corrode and damage the nacre of your pearls. This will happen after many years of handling your pearls – so don’t worry too much about handling your pearls, just be sure to always wipe your pearls with a soft moist cloth after each use.

ISSUE

Cracked, dry-looking nacre

SOLUTION

Pearls will crack if lacking moisture. Always include a damp cloth when storing your cultured pearl jewelry. Never store in a dry area like a safety-deposit box. Store your cultured pearls in a moist location (not dry) away from other jewelry items and most importantly away from heat to prevent damage to the pearl nacre.

Pearls will crack and discolor when exposed to heat or intense light so avoid wearing your pearls while cooking or tanning.

ISSUE

Pits, chips, and scratches in nacre

SOLUTION

Cultured pearls measure a 2.5 to 4 on the Mohs Hardness Scale and fair in the toughness category which means they are not durable and scratch easily. Avoid hitting your cultured pearls against a hard surface like a glass countertop. Always set or lie your pearl jewelry down gently on a soft cloth or pad. Never rub your pearls against a harsh fabric such as wool – as harsh fabrics will damage the nacre of your pearls over time.

ISSUE

Dirty, worn stringing material

SOLUTION

Pearls are either knotted on jewelers silk or strung on beading wire. Pearls are knotted to prevent adjacent pearls from scratching one another. Knotting also prevents loss of your pearls should the silk break.

Beading wire provides added durability against breakage. Pearls should be restrung once a year (depending on use) as all stringing materials become weak after prolonged use.

Pearl Facts

FOR SMART SHOPPERS

FACT:

Cultured Pearls

ARE REAL PEARLS

The vast majority of pearls for sale today (over 99%) are cultured (grown) by one of several methods. Cultured pearls are genuine pearls made of the same nacre found in natural pearls. Cultured pearls are formed by the same processes inside mussels and oysters that form natural pearls. Pearls form around irritants that get inside a mussel or oyster. The primary difference between natural and cultured pearls is how the irritant gets inside the mollusk.

FACT:

Natural Pearls

ARE RARE AND EXPENSIVE

Naturally occurring pearls are extremely rare and are most often vintage gems found selling in auction houses or estate sales for very high prices. A single baby bracelet of top-quality natural 6mm pearls (similar to the top-quality cultured pearls we use in our jewelry lines) would sell for thousands of dollars. A single 16mm natural Freshwater pearl of very high quality recently sold at auction for $50,000.

OUR

Ethical Standards

 

We strictly adhere to the AGTA Code of Ethics and Principles of Fair Business Practices and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) jewelry and precious metals guidelines. The FTC states you must use the term “cultured” when referring to cultured pearls. Merely referring to a pearl as a “pearl” instead of a “cultured pearl” implies the pearl is natural.

We pride ourselves in upholding the ethical standards set forth by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA), and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

OUR

Ethical Standards